Access Keys:
Skip to content (Access Key - 0)
Log In
OCSLD
Assessment Compact Good Practice Exemplars

Home

Brookes Assessment Compact Good Practice Exemplars

This site contains eight case studies of assessment practices in Oxford Brookes University modules. They were chosen as exemplars of practices that align with the Oxford Brookes University Assessment Compact and were compiled by Greg Benfield from a two-year evaluation of the impact of the Assessment Compact commissioned by the University's Academic Enhancement and Standards Committee (AESC). The evaluation team was Greg Benfield, Margaret Price, Chris Rust, and Birgit den Outer.

(opens in a new window)

The eight examples most closely align with the following clauses of the Assessment Compact:

2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.2 (Programme level design)
2.3 (Students’ understanding of the provided assessment criteria supported, relationship between learning outcomes and assessment)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (Active engagement of students in self assessment, peer review, encouraging dialogue)

These cases are notable in that evaluations found very high levels of student satisfaction with the assessment and feedback practices used in them. The most perceived impact on learning related to frequent and timely feedback and active engagement in assessment (as assessors, peer and self).

The practice that was found to have the most direct impact on student performance was drafting/redrafting with feedback activities between. Marking and feedback activities with exemplar pieces of work were also perceived to contribute to improved performance.

The Table lists the eight case studies covered in this site and the Assessment Compact clauses they most closely align with.

Module Compact clauses most closely aligned with
U40528 Nursing Children with Complex Care Needs (Faculty of HLS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (Active engagement of students in self assessment, peer review, encouraging dialogue).
U42597 Consolidating Strategies for Client-Centred Practice I (Faculty of HLS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.3 (Students understanding of the provided assessment criteria supported)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (actively involving students in assessment and dialogue)
U43702 Development of the Human Body and Mind (Faculty of HLS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (actively involving students in assessment and dialogue)
U30021/30022 Architectural Design 1/Architectural Design 2 (Faculty of TDE) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.2 (programme level design)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
P70309 Reflection and Criticality in Education (Faculty of HSS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (actively involving students in assessment and dialogue)
U67774 In Cold Blood: Violence in the Modern Era (Faculty of HSS) 2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (Active engagement of students in self assessment)
U75144 Digital Media and Youth Identities (Faculty of HSS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.3 (relationship between learning outcomes and assessment)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)
2.6 (peer review)
U21132 Environmental Hazard Management (Faculty of HSS) 2.1 (Assessment is integral to teaching and learning)
2.3 (relationship between learning outcomes and assessment)
2.5 (timely feedback provided)

Key themes

There are five important themes running through these cases.

  1. Students appreciate well-structured feedback processes. Evaluations of each of the modules in these cases show students are enormously appreciative of well-structured feedback processes in their modules. Focus group sessions with students repeatedly confirmed this to the evaluation team.
  2. Providing good feedback to students is challenging, especially in large teaching teams. Feedback structures need to be both expertly designed and expertly implemented. In our cases the vast majority of students were very positive about their experiences of assessment and feedback. But even the best designed and run modules elicit negative student comments. We encountered some students whose experience did not live up to the promise of the structures provided in their modules. This usually related to inadequacies or inconsistencies in the way feedback was given across a large teaching team.
  3. Student performance can improve by shifting the balance of assessment from summative to formative tasks. In several cases, despite devoting more face-to-face contact time to formative assessment processes and less to course content, student results improved and their perceptions of the learning environment generally were highly positive.
  4. Students have mixed views about the value of self and peer assessment. Several cases show that while some students appreciated the opportunities to give and receive feedback from peers, and to assess their own work, others did not value this highly. Depending on their understanding of the nature and process of assessment students have different expectations of feedback and peer review. The Brookes Assessment Compact seeks to encourage the early development of assessment literacy through involving students in assessment, especially as assessor (self or peer). Only through developing student understanding of the complexity of assessment and assessment standards can we expect them to see the benefits of peer review and other sources of feedback. There are some indications that a more positive view of the value of peer assessment can be obtained through designs that overtly link the peer assessment tasks with the possibility of improving performance in summative assessment tasks.
  5. There is value in taking a programme approach to assessment design. It can take time for students to appreciate the value of active engagement in assessment, especially as assessors (self or peer). It follows that such opportunities should be built in to programmes in their early stages, then developed and used subsequently throughout. We found examples of good assessment practices in large, core, first year modules offering spin-off benefits to other modules, notably in helping students to understand criteria and to appreciate the value of self- and peer-assessment.
Enter labels to add to this page:
Please wait 
Looking for a label? Just start typing.
Adaptavist Theme Builder (3.3.5-conf210) Powered by Atlassian Confluence 3.0.0_01, the Enterprise Wiki.